Coworking in New York: Grind

The Big Apple is home to an increasingly influential movement in workspace design – coworking. Here is one of four places we’re featuring as examples of atypical office spaces that offer big opportunities for non-traditional workers.


Founder: Benjamin Dyett

How we work is changing, but where we work isn’t. Over the last 10 years, a new way of working has emerged, along with some people who live it every day:

  • They’re available 24/7
  • They network endlessly, and then plug their skills into others’ in surprising combinations
  • They choose when and how they do what they do, on their terms
  • They don’t want job security—they want career fluidity

But when they look for a place to do all that, the options are weirdly outdated: office, home, or on the go – say, a cafe. Those are actually poor choices. Offices mean fixed cost and daily routine. Home is isolated and full of distractions. And cafes get old after the second latte.

People Working

Grind is a collaborative workspace. We’re certainly not an incubator or an accelerator. And we don’t like to call ourselves a coworking space because we’re a different type of platform: we are centered on building and connecting a community. That is the core of what we’re doing here. The chairs, the tables, the real-estate, and renting a seat or a desk are secondary to constructing a strong community.

In short, Grind is a new kind of workplace for a new kind of worker.

Front Lobby

It’s frictionless space for free radicals.

  • Frictionless means we’ve removed every barrier between people and their productivity. Whether that means accessing technology, resources, and partners — or just being distraction-free, comfortable, and inspired.
  • Free radicals are the people who are the future of work. They operate through nimble, networked collaboration rather than rigid hierarchies and set processes. Grind is built from scratch for them.

The surge in freelancers — which many people see as the new industrial revolution of our time — is fueled by the fact that people no longer want to work in corporations, but still want to be part of a community. Most of our members are individuals, and not every one person has the full toolkit to get to the end of a project that they’re trying to achieve.

Grind – Open Floor Space

What we try to create here is a community where people can look to their left and right to find expertise and knowledge that they don’t have, so that they get the best work done.

 

Benjamin Dyett

Throughout his career, Benjamin Dyett has founded, funded, operated, and advised successful start-ups. He has long experience in real estate and corporate law, has represented financial institutions and prominent businesspeople, owned his own consulting firm, and has always been at the epicenter of where business and imagination meet.

 

 

 

 

For more images and information on Grind, check out their other article in Workspace Design Magazine: Behind the Curtain: Grind

Katherine Tracey

Katherine Tracey is Work Design Magazine's former events director. She is intrigued by the combination of design and business in the A/E/C industry. When not planning the next conference or local talk, Katherine is out sailing on the bay, skiing down a snowy slope, or exploring new places.

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