Snagajob Designs for Flexibility and Fun

Natural light, scenic views, and an aluminum slide might indeed belong in a park. Instead, they’re design details of the new headquarters of one of the country’s fastest growing companies: Snagajob.

Snagajob

Snagajob – which has 250 employees – already had a strong corporate culture — it ranked #1 in the Great Places to Work Small & Medium category by Entrepreneur Magazine in 2011. So design firm Baskervill redesigned Snagajob’s 67,000-square-foot space to better reflect the lively culture, creativity, and camaraderie found there.

Snagajob – Collaboration/Teamwork space

Early in the programming and Immersion phase, the expectations were clear: “Snaggers” would participate first-hand in the development of their new office space.

The design goals – which we worked together to identify during the Immersion process – included bringing the outdoors indoors, making it fun, and designing for teamwork and collaboration.

Snagajob – open office environment

The entire team wanted to create an environment that enables Snaggers to work more effectively, improve communication, be comfortable, and stimulate innovation.

So to start, Baskervill chose floor-to-ceiling windows that flood the area with light. This allows for scenic views of the pond.

Snagajob – Conference Room

Instead of private offices, the new space now features intentionally designed areas that create opportunities for casual collisions, collaboration, and synergy. More than 20 conference rooms populate the space to allow for spontaneous and scheduled collaboration, ensuring the creative process is always in motion.

The scope of work included interior architecture/design, space planning, features, furniture, and fixtures. Private offices were replaced by a strategically positioned design of open and collaborative space, evoking an energetic community-based working atmosphere. Natural light — and materials such as concrete, wood, and metal — serve as a canvas for custom assembled furniture, bright splashes of color, and employee photos.

Snagajob – open floor plan

The open floor plan was a challenging opportunity. On one hand, it allowed for spontaneity, gathering spaces, and encouraged free exchange of ideas. On the other hand, wall space was at a premium, and each wall had to be carefully considered for its functionality.

So Baskerville fashioned the ceiling to add height, light, details, articulation, and aesthetic design elements. Creative use of materials on a limited budget allowed them to focus on high-impact community spaces.

Snagajob – “The Hill”

The new space also includes a town center gathering space, kitchen, beer taps, and “The Hill.” An intricate part of the corporate culture, The Hill (a six-tier riser), transforms into a lively and engaging space for the entire company to meet, share information, and celebrate with “shout outs,” where employees and leadership recognize outstanding performance and important business/personal milestones.

The show-stopper is the stainless steel slide, a practical icon of fun providing employees quick transport between the space’s two floors. This playful accent is intended to stimulate workers and visitors to “do things differently.”

Snagajob – Stainless steel slide – in the office

The response from employees and leadership has been overwhelmingly positive. Employees can even be seen on the weekends enjoying the space and playing ping pong — not necessarily working. The new space reinforces the client’s motto “bust it while having fun,” and serves as a physical communicator of this company’s culture, brand, mission, and process.

The final design immediately reflects this unique brand to the company’s employees, clients, and visitors.

Who says the office has to be dull? This one isn’t.

 

  • Architect/Design Firm – Baskervill
  • Photo Credits – Chris Cunningham
Susan Orange

Susan Orange is a certified interior designer at Baskervill. With 26 years of experience focusing on delivering innovative office environments that translates corporate brand through the physical space. She holds a B.A. in Fine Arts from Virginia Commonwealth University.

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